Camping on Hawaii

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Camping in Hawai'i

Camping on Hawaii is adventurous fun for all ages. Grab your gear and visit these campsites or find your own:

Kauai Camping

In Kōkeʻe State Park, you can hike trails to see waterfalls, deep valleys, tropical forests, and views of the Na Pali coast. There are strenuous and easy hikes, a museum to visit, and plenty of photo opportunities for you to enjoy. Camping here will be in rustic cabins. There are grills and cold showers available. In Kanaloahuluhulu Meadows you can walk in and enjoy the campsites. Kawaikoi and Sugi Grove campsites are harder to access. You will need a 4-wheel drive to get to them.

Polihale State Park is another option on Kauai. Here, visitors can enjoy miles of privacy. Access is limited by dirt-roads that require 4-wheel drive. Pitch your tent on the beach or in a campsite that borders the road. There are bathrooms and shower facilities, as well as pavilions, for you to use.

In the Nāpali Coast State Wilderness Park, you can explore Kalalau Valley, where camping is truly rugged. Composting toilets and rain shelters are the primitive offerings here. However, the terraced campsites are situated near a stream and the views are stunning.

You may want to check out Anini Beach Park for great snorkeling and swimming, or choose Lydgate Campground for a large playground, bathrooms, showers and a pavilion.

Oahu Camping

Ahupuaʻa ʻO Kahana State Park is for those looking to connect with the Hawaiian culture. Programs are offered to help guests understand the culture and values of Hawaiians. Easy hiking trails cut through tropical forests. Campsites have picnic tables, showers and restrooms.

Keaiwa Heiau State Recreation Area holds a cultural treasure- the Keaiwa Heiau temple. Here, early Hawaiian’s sought the help of the kahuna, who prayed and used herbs to heal them. There are pines, lemons and eucalyptus trees that make a fragrant walk along the Aiea Loop through the forest. There are picnic benches, fire pits, and wild pigs in the campground.

Malaekahana State Recreation Area has 37 campsites at Kalanai Point and Kahuku section. Do some surf fishing, body surfing or just enjoy the peaceful wooded areas where a picnic would be lovely. There are picnic tables, showers and bathrooms for your convenience.

Sand Island State Recreation Area has shoreline campsites available, however the airport is nearby in this urban camping area. There are walking trails to enjoy, as well as fishing or bodyboarding. Bring your off-road vehicles and bikes for use on the adjacent Sand Island OHV riding area.

Bellows Field Beach Park Campground has 50 campsites, 2 comfort stations and outdoor showers. There is a beautiful beach to enjoy. Kahua Nui-Makai Campground has beautiful botanical gardens to enjoy, as well as 15 campsites in the rainforest.

Maui Camping

Polipoli Spring State Recreation Area is one of the cooler places to camp due to its high altitude. Trails pass through grasslands, conifers, redwood forests, and even by an old cabin. Located in the fog belt and accessible by 4-wheel drive, primitive tent camping and one cabin are ready for use. There are no facilities.

Wai’anananapa State Park camping holds all kinds of interest for visitors – lava tubes, blow holes, black sand beaches and folk lore of red tide pools. Tents and campers are allowed. There are bbq grills, restrooms, outdoor showers and picnic tables. There are also cabins to rent with a livingroom/kitchen combo, a bathroom and a bedroom.

Other good camping options include Hosmer Grove Campground and Kipahulu Campground. Hosmer Grove has primitive camping with pit toilets, available drinking water, and a good chance of rain. Kipahulu Campground has picnic tables and grills, pit toilets, and no water availability. This campground is near Seven Sacred Pools.

Whether you choose primitive or cabin camping, you can count on amazing scenery and lots of fun activities while camping on Hawaii.